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Message board > Engines > Mounting an Auxiliary engine Hardy 20

Message 14 of 14
Posted by member Keith Lewcock on Tuesday 13 April 2021

I noted the comments about the auxilliary not functioning by Rob. I have a 2018 6hp mercury for use as an auxilliary. As my boat is to be launched on Thursday 15th I thought I should make sure it runs. Despite being less than 2 years old and only run for about an hour it failed to even fire. The spark plug was dry. Reluctantly I took the carburetor off and removed the float chamber. The main jet was totally blocked with crud. Having cleaned it and refitted the engine started immediataly. Lots of helpful videos on Youtube. Problem probably caused by Ethanol in the fuel left over the winter. I also found out that there is a drain plug to drain fuel from the float chamber which is very helpful.
Although the Mercury has its own fuel tank I have bought a fuel pipe to connect it to my main fuel tanks. Again on advice from Rob. The main fuel for my main Evinrude engine is higher octane (not Ethanol free) from a main supplier and has recommended additives. I will be checking over the winter and increasing any additive left in the main fuel tanks or emptying them into a car. I also have installed a very heavy outboard bracket with 4 springs. The auxiliary weighs 27kgs.

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Message 13 of 14
Posted by member Rob on Tuesday 6 April 2021

* Hi
This is a picture of the engine inverted. I think my outboard bracket has four different levels I can use. I have to turn the outboard 90 degrees to be able to tilt it like this.

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Message 12 of 14
Posted by member Rob on Monday 5 April 2021

Further to my last comment, I am sure you can have the back up engine positioned so that it is deep enough to control the boat and can be lifted clear of the water when not in use. However it may involve buying a different outboard bracket. I will take some pictures when I am next a the boat.

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Message 11 of 14
Posted by member Rob on Monday 5 April 2021

Hi
i don't know if this has been mentioned but looking at the picture from Keith Lewcock (message 7 of 10) answers it.
I have a 4 stroke, 5hp Mercury which is the same as the Mariner except for the label on the outside. The power head is a Tohatsu on all Mariner/Mercury 4 stroke engines between 4 to 6hp. When I am going along with my main 50hp Mariner 4 stroke, I have my 5hp engine like Keith's picture. You pull it up with the bracket, then loosen the steering lock, then turn it 90 degrees, then lock it again. This way it is out of the water. This may be dependant on what sort of auxiliary bracket you have. It is important that the engine when really needed can go deep enough in the water to power the boat.
On a similar note, in my opinion it is not sufficient to just start up your auxiliary engine(back up engine) and run it for 10 minutes. I used to do this and when I really need my back up engine it stopped because the marina that repaired the carburettor did not do a good job and I only found this out after 1 mile. Now on my hardly used 2010 engine. I regularly now will test the back up engine for 2 miles, with the steering on the back up engine locked and then use the main engine to steer with.
I also think it is very important to not just have an internal fuel tank on the back up engine, as I once needed the back up engine for 5 miles when my main engine developed a crack in the petrol pump. Imagine trying to lean over the stern of the boat to top up the back up engine where there is no where to moor up, in rough water. ideally try and get a back up engine with the same petrol pipe connectors as the main engine, as you could need to start the back up engine in a hurry.

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Message 10 of 14
Posted by member Caroline Munro on Sunday 4 April 2021

Hi Keith,
We just came up with that solution today. We have raised and wider the wood on the bracket today. With the engine only having one click up we are going to jam something in it. (Big eye roll) Good to know it that others had to resort to that too! Fab to see a picture Thank you so much.
Might be worth noting, anyone thinking about an Auxiliary that the mariners don't click up.
Will post my soulution when she is put back together
Caroline

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Message 9 of 14
Posted by member Keith Lewcock on Wednesday 31 March 2021

Hi Caroline. Getting the auxilliary outboard to work as efficiently as possible leaves you with few choices about its resting position in a boat with a deep transom like the Hardy 20. Locating the outboard high enough to allow it to go into the horizontal position means the prop and cavitation plate will be above the bottom of the hull. It may not matter in non-tidal waters but in tidal waters you want the auxilliary to perform at maximum efficiency.
It is probable the one click you mention is to allow the outboard to run in shallow water in an emergency. The Mercury also has this one click but It is not enough to raise the prop out of the water even with the outboard bracket at maximum height and therefore we had to compromise with a piece of plastic pipe which worked well.
Good luck.

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Message 8 of 14
Posted by member Caroline Munro on Tuesday 30 March 2021

Hi Keith,
We just came up with that solution today. We have raised and wider the wood on the bracket today. With the engine only having one click up we are going to jam something in it. (Big eye roll) Good to know it that others had to resort to that too! Fab to see a picture Thank you so much.
Might be worth noting, anyone thinking about an Auxiliary that the mariners don't click up.
Will post my soulution when she is put back together
Caroline

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Message 7 of 14
Posted by member Keith Lewcock on Tuesday 30 March 2021

* Not sure if you got the photo. See attached.

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Message 6 of 14
Posted by member Keith Lewcock on Tuesday 30 March 2021

Hi Caroline. I had a mercury 6hp 4 stroke longshaft and fitted an outboard bracket to my Hardy 20 River Pilot. Ideally the aux. outboard cavitation plate should be level with the bottom of the boat so the prop can be most efficient if required. This we did but unfortunately when under power from the main outboard the auxilliary prop dragged in the wash. It was also only possible to steer the auxilliary with the tiller almost vertical. We lifted the auxilliary outboard bracket up, reinforced the inside of the transom and added some packing between the bracket and transom. We still could not lift the engine into the horizontal position but used a plastic pipe to raise the engine enough to keep it clear of the water. In one emergency we had to use the auxilliary when a faulty valve on the petrol tank caused the main outboard to stop. The auxilliary engine worked very well but we had to steer with the tiller close to vertical although we did use the main engine for some primitive steering. I think it is unlikely that you will be able to position the auxillary so that it can be horizontal when not needed but at the right depth when needed. I also made the mistake of fitting a lightweight outboard bracket. The Mercury engine weighs approx. 25kg and was incredibly difficult to raise and lower. Get a substantial bracket. My new boat has a bracket with four springs. Also quite hard to find info on the 'drop' of the auxillary bracket. See the photo atached and hope this helps.

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Message 5 of 14
Posted by member Caroline Munro on Sunday 28 March 2021

Thanks Graham :),

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Message 4 of 14
Posted by member Graham Clay on Saturday 27 March 2021

* Better photo of the sprung bracket on Lorien; sorry, seems to be rotated 90 degrees!

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Message 3 of 14
Posted by member Caroline Munro on Thursday 25 March 2021

Thanks Graham

I'll will have a look at the sprung brackets :)

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Message 2 of 14
Posted by member Graham Clay on Thursday 25 March 2021

* Hi,
We have a Pilot SE 20ft. The auxiliary outboard bracket fitted to her is a sprung type, so as well as tilting the outboard leg, the whole bracket can move up and down by maybe a foot. That seems to be enough to lift the leg clear of the water?
I don't have a great photo, but this might give you an idea?
Graham

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Message 1 of 14
Posted by member Caroline Munro on Tuesday 23 March 2021

Hello All
First Post.

We bought a Hardy 20 last year during lockdown, we cleaned her up and got her onto the water as soon as we could... perhaps a little hasty! It's our first boat so we were excited and very very green.

Leaks and engine problems were our main issues (& learning how to sail). With no auxiliary we had to be towed home on our first trip out, the learningexperiencestarted quickly. We started a hunt for a long shift auxiliary... they were like hens teeth!
We finallt got one just as the season ended, but it draggs in the water? We can't seem to get it lifted high enough due to the shape of the boat.. what have you done ?

Following 3 engine failures we knew we needed a newer and more powerful engine and a new one is now being fitted.

Next challenge and Post is about leaks :( The toilet, the windows screws, the aerial ...
Oh and how to get a dog on and off a boat... the wee puppy in November is now big !

Many thanks in anticipation

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