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Message 15 of 15
Posted by member Ian Petrie on Thursday 9 July 2020

* Hi. I have purchased recently a Family Pilot 20 where the previous owner had replaced the rope fender but it was sagging on the starboard side. The boat is powered by a 50hp Yamaha Outboard. I hope this advice is helpful to anyone fitting or tensioning the rope fender. I agree, best done with the boat out of the water.
1. Once you are satisfied with the cord attachment at the prow, work your way along the boat, shuffling the fender into place working towards where you have already loose fitted to the retaining hasps at the stern.
2. Make sure the cable eyelet is vertical.
3. Use a ratchet strap to tension the cable, all the time working the fender along to boat to the stern. It is very important that you tension the cable square and level at the transom, otherwise the rope just sags again.
Many would say attach the strap between the two end eyelets of the fender. But what, if as on my boat, the outboard is in the way?
4. Make a double loop of chord long enough to go through the fender retaining hasp on the stern. Loop it through the fender eyelet, then the stern hasp. This method gives you enough room to tie the fender off on the hasp without the strap being in the way.
5. The slack was on the starboard side so, to avoid damaging and interference from the outboard, I removed the motor cowl.
I attached one end of the ratchet strap upwards and diagonally to the rear port mooring cleat and the other to the doubled chord loop I had threaded through the cable eyelet then the fender hasp on the transom, thus clearing the outboard.
6. Keep moving the fender along the boat towards the stern as you tension.
If you are fitting a new rope, possibly best to keep swapping sides with the ratchet strap to ensure even tension around the whole boat.
Worked a treat. Hope this is useful.

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Message 14 of 15
Posted by member julian knapp on Wednesday 10 June 2020

Hi
Very helpful I'll save this job for the winter but I might take the existing one off in advance as she isn't going to get a lot of use this year - I assume all I would need to send off would be the wire and not the whole thing.
Continuing thanks - we have paid for her now so cant wait for Friday!

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Message 13 of 15
Posted by member Richard Moynan on Thursday 4 June 2020

The rope has a plastic covered wire core of which the length is specific to your model of boat. The rope os wound round this and bound at each end and this binding is shrouded with leather neatly. When a rope is replaced the rope specialist unwind a length of rope and rewind it round your core wire centre. The wire is not visible, but is important because it give constant length to the rope because the natural fibres shrink and expand with wet and dry conditions. Tensioning the wire gives consistent tautness and keeps the rope in place.
The rope is fitted in a "groove" round the hull, suspended for the first third from the bow by small eyelets with lacing round the wire ( which gives invisible look) and for the remaining two thirds in a small hardwood "shelf" and is the tied at the stern onto an eye on each side. It sounds complicated but is simple and effective. It will all become clear when you see your boat ! It could be replaced afloat, but would be ten times easier on dry land.

Hope tis is helpful

regards Richard

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Message 12 of 15
Posted by member julian knapp on Thursday 4 June 2020

How does the wire and the rope co-exist??
Is there a video available as to what this job entails
I assume its an out of the water winter job
Wire is said to be boat specific
Any more info re this would help
OR will all become clear when I get the boat (next Friday - cant wait) - she will be going straight in the water and won't be out again until mid Oct
Just heard my Hip op might be in 5 weeks good news but a bit of a bugger re boating only 3 weeks to get acquainted!
BFN

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Message 11 of 15
Posted by member Richard Moynan on Tuesday 2 June 2020

Keith
Go to " Steve Brecken's Hydrofin Dual Rudder Kit" Post I made an error which the webmaster will rectify

regards Richard

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Message 10 of 15
Posted by member Keith Lathwell on Tuesday 2 June 2020

Hi Richard,
what kit did you fit?
Rgds Keith

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Message 9 of 15
Posted by member julian knapp on Tuesday 2 June 2020

Thanks for this - learning a lot already - I didn't know/think it had a wire core! Logical now I know.
Coir it is then
J

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Message 8 of 15
Posted by member Richard Moynan on Monday 1 June 2020

Although we were not winners of the competitions last autumn, we purchased a kit for our Yam 80 on our Hardy Fisher 20. The Exe estuary can be quite challenging in adverse conditions, so with the various testimonials (and I can be quite sceptical of testimonials) I could see the potential for this kit.
Finally back on the water, I can confirm the claims. There is an impressive improvement in all aspects of handling. She is so much more controllable and responsive at slow speed especially mooring up or going into a pontoon. The other great improvement is in directional stability when holding course at all speeds. We were tinkering around with the wheel constantly, now you can pretty much set a course and correct with a degree or so at a time - unheard of in previous seasons. Even in the turbulent waters just outside Exmouth dock at certain stages of the tide, you only have to make reasonable adjustment.
I would say it was a very worthwhile purchase, It will enhance the pleasure and safety of our boat and I am glad we went with our instinct, Steve is very helpful and it was very easy to fit. What more can I say !

regards Richard

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Message 7 of 15
Posted by member Richard Moynan on Monday 1 June 2020

* Michael

We have just had our rope renewed using our old sound wire. It was done in Coir which we were advised was as good as synthetic for length of life. They also said it was easier to use the Coir because the synthetic did not always rewind onto the wire core as well. It was done by Westwood Rope and Wire of Exeter and cost a fraction of the price in these posts. I attach a photo of the result, we threaded through entire black drain pipe at the point were the deck drains are before attaching and stretched using a ratchet strap attached to some thick agricultural twine fixed at the rope end of the lacing eyes and then laced and got a really snug fitting rope. We are very pleased with the result and I attach a photo for you to judge for yourself.

regards

Richard Moynan

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Message 6 of 15
Posted by member Simon Papendick on Saturday 30 May 2020

Hi Julian.

It is Trad rope fender. The other rope fenders spoilt the look of the boat. That's my opinion.

Regards

Simon

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Message 5 of 15
Posted by member Julian Knapp on Saturday 30 May 2020

Thanks I'll wait to see what's there (boat delivery scheduled for the 12th June) and then review - so this would be trad rope not synthetic?
J

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Message 4 of 15
Posted by member Simon Papendick on Saturday 30 May 2020

Hi Julian,

I have fitted many a rope fender in my time at Hardy Marine and since, I get my Rope Fenders through Hardy Marine as they get them in to order from the original manufacturers. The cost this time last year was about 600.00 for a Hardy 25 Rope Fender. If the lacing eyes and U Bolts are on the Transom are on the boat then the job is nor difficult. I have in the past bought the Rope Fender and then fitted for clients.

Regards

Simon Papendick
J-Star Boat Services

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Message 3 of 15
Posted by member Julian Knapp on Thursday 28 May 2020

What did you end up doing as I will need a new one for my 25 - cost??

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Message 2 of 15
Posted by member Rob on Friday 25 October 2019

Hello Michael
If you are fitting it yourself, I would get quotes from other companies, such as Rope Services UK. I feel the synthetic ones will last as long as the coir ones.
Hope this helps.
Rob

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Message 1 of 15
Posted by member Michael Williams on Thursday 24 October 2019

We are considering getting a synthetic rope fender for our 1992 Hardy 25 from Chatham Rope Makers. Has anyone any experience of synthetic rope fenders in terms of durability & suitability, as opposed to the normal Coir??

Michael Williams
Puffin of Rame

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